4 Reasons Why You Should Visit a Holistic Dentist

Washington DC Dentist

Many people are unaware of the many different options available when it comes to choosing a dentist. If you want to approach your dental care in a more holistic manner, then going to a holistic dentist is a great solution. Below are just four of the ways holistic dentists stand out from traditional dental practices.

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Why you should smile at strangers

Next time you’re out walking about, you may want to give passers-by a smile, or at least a nod. Recent research reveals that these tiny gestures can make people feel more connected.

People who have been acknowledged by a stranger feel more connected to others immediately after the experience than people who have been deliberately ignored, according to study reported here today (May 24) at the annual meeting of the Society for the Study of Motivation.

“Ostracism is painful,” said study researcher Eric Wesselmann, a social psychologist at Purdue University in Indiana. “Sometimes, colloquially, I like to say ostracism sucks. It’s not a pleasant experience.”

The pain is psychological, but it can also extend to the physical. Studies have linked loneliness to a weakened immune system and a hardening of the arteries, for example. And a variety of laboratory experiments have shown that when a person is excluded, even if for a brief time in something as inconsequential as a silly computer game, they feel worse about themselves and experience an all-around sour mood.

Researchers suspect that this response is evolutionary. Humans are social animals, adapted for group living, Wesselmann said.  

“If you depend upon others for your survival, if you are culled from that group, you are as good as dead,” he said.

If that’s the case, people should be very tuned-in to clues about social acceptance and rejection. Wesselmann and his colleagues decided to conduct a subtle experiment to find out. Their participants, 239 pedestrians in a busy campus area, didn’t even know they were part of a study. They simply passed by someone who acknowledged them politely, acknowledged them with a smile or stared straight through them as if they weren’t even there. The researchers were aiming to create a feeling the Germans call “wie Luft behandeln,” or “to be looked at as though air.” [ 7 Thoughts That Are Bad For You ]

(Psychology has also explained another German expression, “ schadenfreude,” or the joy we sometimes get when others fail.)

Immediately after this encounter, the unknowing participants got waylaid by another person who asked them to fill out a survey on social connectedness. The participants had no idea that the stranger who had just passed them was part of this study. A fourth group of participants filled out the survey without ever encountering the stranger at all.

The survey results showed that being pointedly ignored by a stranger had an immediate effect. Participants who’d gotten the cold shoulder reported feeling more socially disconnected than people who’d gotten acknowledged, whether that acknowledgement came with a smile or not. People who hadn’t encountered the stranger fell somewhere in the middle.

Cities, suburbs and rural areas all have their own rules about street meet-and-greets. (You’d likely get strange looks nodding at every stranger on the sidewalk in Manhattan, but ignoring fellow walkers in small-town Tennessee wouldn’t be looked upon kindly.) Those regional differences could influence the results, Wesselmann told LiveScience, though it’s likely that the deliberate “wie Luft behandeln” look would be off-putting anywhere.

Wesselmann and his colleagues detailed their results in February in the journal Psychological Science.

Benefits of your 100 watt Smile

Smiling could be good for your health.
Researchers are finding that wearing a smile brings certain benefits, like slowing down the heart and reducing stress. This may even happen when people aren’t aware they are forming a smile, according to a recent study. The work follows research that established that the act of smiling can make you feel happier. Some research suggests only a full and genuine smile affects the body in positive ways. Other studies, though, indicate even a polite smile may be beneficial. Frowning also may have a health effect: Preventing people from frowning, such as with the use of Botox, can help alleviate depression, a recent study found.
“You can influence mental health by what you do with your face, whether you smile more or frown less,” says Eric Finzi, a dermatologic surgeon and co-author of the study on frowning.
Kyle Gorjanc, of Brooklyn, N.Y., regularly runs for exercise and long-distance training. After seeing race photos of herself grimacing, Ms. Gorjanc, 32 years old, began about a year ago making a conscious effort to smile when running. “I started by literally forcing myself to smile. Now I think I do it more naturally,” she says.
Smiling has helped her feel less stressed and tired while running, she says. Since the biggest challenge in long-distance running isn’t physical but mental, smiling “ensures that long-distance running will be much, much easier,” says Ms. Gorjanc, a co-founder of an online resource for women runners called Salty Running. “What happens is you actually find things to be happy about instead of just smiling for the sake of doing it,” she says. And of course other people smile back, she says.
A study published in the journal Psychological Science in November found that people who smiled after engaging in stress-inducing tasks showed a greater reduction in heart rate than people who maintained a neutral facial expression. The study, which involved 170 participants, got people to smile unknowingly by making them hold a pair of chopsticks in three different ways in their mouth. One way forced people to maintain a neutral expression, another prompted a polite smile, and a third resulted in a full smile that uses the muscles around the mouth and the eyes.
“We saw a steeper decline in heart rate and a faster physiological stress recovery when they were smiling,” even though the participants weren’t aware they were making facial expressions, says Sarah Pressman, co-author of the study and an assistant psychology professor at University of California, Irvine. Participants making a full smile performed better than the polite-smile group, but the difference wasn’t statistically significant and needs to be studied further, she says.
“We smile because we feel not threatened,” says Dr. Pressman. Over time that message evolved so the muscle activity involved in a smile sends a message to the brain signaling safety, which could translate into lower heart rate and stress levels. Dr. Pressman is currently researching how smiling affects certain stress hormones, such as cortisol, and oxytocin, which is sometimes called the trust hormone. “We’ve already seen it with heart rate; we’re hoping to see it with these other stress levels in the body,” she says.
Some experts believe only a genuine, full smile, confers health benefits. Such a smile, commonly referred to as a Duchenne smile, after the 19th century French neurologist who first described it, activates major muscles around the mouth and the eyes. By contrast, a standard social smile, which is sometimes called a Pan Am smile after the polite expression the former airline’s stewardesses used to greet passengers, activates only the muscles around the mouth. A Duchenne smile “generates the physiology of positive emotion and the changes in the brain” associated with spontaneous enjoyment, says Paul Ekman, a professor emeritus of psychology at the University of California, San Francisco.
Studies have found that the intensity of a person’s smile can help predict life satisfaction over time and even longevity. What’s unclear is whether smiling reflects a person’s overall happiness or if the act of smiling contributes to that happiness. Marianne LaFrance, a psychology professor at Yale University, believes it is a bit of both.
“It’s probably bidirectional,” she says. “People who smile more tend to elicit more positive connections with other people,” which in turn help make you happier and healthier.
Patti Wood, a body-language expert in Atlanta, says politicians, business executives and people preparing for job interviews or who are dating come to her to learn how to smile most effectively and project a positive image. Ms. Wood coaches some clients on getting their whole face involved in a smile. She tells them to bring their cheeks up higher and pull their whole face upward, and she makes sure the eyes show the warmth of a sincere Duchenne smile.
“Every time you’re in the grocery store, practice that smile,” Ms. Wood says she tells clients. “How does that feel? Do I like it? Do I like the results that I get?” Ms. Wood says her rates start at $1,200 for a 3½-hour body-language-training package.
There are a number of other smiles documented in research, including ones reflecting embarrassment, love, desire, disgust and sadness. Researchers map such smiles to study where our emotions come from, their complexity and the impact they have on social relationships.
In the study of frowning, Dr. Finzi injected Botox into the frown muscles of half of a group of 74 people diagnosed with depression, which prevented these patients from frowning. The other half received placebo injections. After six weeks, 27% of the Botox patients went into remission for their depression. That compares with a 7% remission rate for the patients in the control group. Dr. Finzi says the study was presented at a conference in December and is under review for publication.
Richard J. Davidson, director of the Center for Investigating Healthy Minds at the University of Wisconsin, says he is exploring whether activating the frowning muscle between the eyebrows, known as the corrugator, is associated with activity in the amygdala, the part of the brain that processes emotions such as fear. “What we find is that there’s correlated activity but that doesn’t mean that the production of the facial expression actually causes these changes in the brain,” he says. “That requires much more research.”
Some experts caution against suppressing facial emotion, be it good or bad. Dacher Keltner, a psychology professor at University of California, Berkeley, says studies have shown that people who use Botox to hide lines on their face feel less pleasure in response to subtle things around them and aren’t able to read other people’s emotions as well.
And what effect do people who smile have on others? Experts say there is a real positive impact. Marco Iacoboni, a lab director at the UCLA Brain Mapping Center, says when people see a smile, so-called mirror neurons fire in their brain and evoke a similar neural response as if they were smiling themselves.
Say Chopsticks
Holding the sticks in the mouth activates the same muscles we use for smiling.
After engaging in stressful tasks, people reduced their heart rate more quickly if they smiled, a recent study found. Participants held chopsticks in their mouth in different ways to, from left, keep a neutral expression, make a standard smile or form a full smile.

Cosmetic Dentistry – what should you know?

 Cosmetic dentistry is something that many people are deciding is a good option for them. Not only are they doing it out of necessity, many people are doing it simply because they want to try to improve their overall looks. This is something that many people are looking to do, however they have a lot of questions and concerns in regards to what they can do in order to make sure that what they are getting is what is going to be best for them.

Know Who You Are Working With

The thing about cosmetic dentistry is that in most cases, it is not necessary. This means that you will be paying out of pocket for whatever procedures you decide that you want to have done. In the event that you are having the surgery out of necessity, you may need to go to whoever your insurance directs you as opposed to having the freedom to make a choice in regards to who will be doing the work. If you are having elective dental surgery, take advantage of your freedom of choice.

When you are considering who it is will be performing the cosmetic dentistry, you need to make sure that they are going to do the work you want and that the level of quality you will receive will be what you want. You do have the ability to look at multiple options and to decide on who it is will be doing your work and how much money you will be spending to have the work done. Investigate a little to see what it is you will be getting and how much work you will be getting for the money you will be spending. This type of surgery is not something that is cheap and you will need to make sure that the work you are having done will be able to meet your expectations and price.

Do some researches on the doctor you choose for your cosmetic dentistry, then you can find out just what kind of a doctor you are working with. Look at some of the different tools out there to see how it is that these different doctors’ work and what it is that they are able to do for you in regards to pricing as well as doing exactly what you want. You should also look to see how past clients  have reviewed them in regards to the quality of their work. Another place you may want to look at is the Better Business Bureau. 

No matter where it is you are looking to have cosmetic dentistry doneArticle Submission, you need to know what you are getting into and what it is you will be doing. Make sure to break down the prices as well as the services you are going to receive so you will know what you can do and how much you will need to pay to get the procedures you want and be able to afford them.

10 Reasons to Smile

1. Smiling Makes Us Attractive

We are drawn to people who smile. There is an attraction factor. We want to know a smiling person and figure out what is so good. Frowns, scowls and grimaces all push people away — but a smile draws them in (avoid these smile aging habits to keep your smile looking great).

2. Smiling Changes Our Mood
Next time you are feeling down, try putting on a smile. There’s a good chance you mood will change for the better. Smiling can trick the body into helping you change your mood.

3. Smiling Is Contagious

When someone is smiling they lighten up the room, change the moods of others, and make things happier. A smiling person brings happiness with them. Smile lots and you will draw people to you.

4. Smiling Relieves Stress

Stress can really show up in our faces. Smiling helps to prevent us from looking tired, worn down, and overwhelmed. When you are stressed, take time to put on a smile. The stress should be reduced and you’ll be better able to take action.

5. Smiling Boosts Your Immune System

Smiling helps the immune system to work better. When you smile, immune function improves possibly because you are more relaxed. Prevent the flu and colds by smiling.

6. Smiling Lowers Your Blood Pressure

When you smile, there is a measurable reduction in your blood pressure. Give it a try if you have a blood pressure monitor at home. Sit for a few minutes, take a reading. Then smile for a minute and take another reading while still smiling. Do you notice a difference?

7. Smiling Releases Endorphins, Natural Pain Killers and Serotonin

Studies have shown that smiling releases endorphins, natural pain killers, and serotonin. Together these three make us feel good. Smiling is a natural drug.

8. Smiling Lifts the Face and Makes You Look Younger

The muscles we use to smile lift the face, making a person appear younger. Don’t go for a face lift, just try smiling your way through the day — you’ll look younger and feel better.

 

9. Smiling Makes You Seem Successful

Smiling people appear more confident, are more likely to be promoted, and more likely to be approached. Put on a smile at meetings and appointments and people will react to you differently.

10. Smiling Helps You Stay Positive

Try this test: Smile. Now try to think of something negative without losing the smile. It’s hard. When we smile our body is sending the rest of us a message that “Life is Good!” Stay away from depression, stress and worry by smiling.

Four Cups of Coffee a Day May Halve Risk of Death from Oral Cancer

Caffeine helps

Dental Implant Center of Florida

Coffee is essential to the morning routines of many people as well as a beverage people enjoy throughout the day. Now there is new evidence for you to enjoy this drink even more, this time for the health benefits.

New research has shown that people who had four or more coffee beverages throughout the day had a lower risk of getting oral and pharyngeal cancer. Research shows that drinking coffee helps to slow down the growth as well as the progression of the disease if someone should already have the diagnosis.

The study also showed that the full effect of prevention was only found with people who drank regular strength coffee. There was a slight effect with people who drank decaf coffee. There was little to no effect found in people who drank tea.

To learn more about this survey and to find out other information about this new research…

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Smile

Smile

Smile it’s Friday!

My Ahh Ha moment

Think about this for a minute…If you want to be blonde no matter what your budget there’s a kit for that, same thing if you wish you were a brunette, and if you wish you had straight hair or curly. It doesn’t stop there, if you want blue eyes or green. If you want to be tall, platform heels, if you want to be skinny, body wraps. If you want couture there’s T.J. Maxx. What if you want to change your smile. What if you hate your crooked teeth? What if you need a bridge but Medicaid only pays for extraction. What if you’re self pay at the dentist, do you get the crown or make do with the temporary. Pulling a tooth because you can’t afford to save it will change your smile. The gap in your smile is something you think about every time you smile for a picture, take a selfie, or walk in front of the mirror. How can we bleach our own teeth, tattoo & pierce ourselves but fillings are for the rich and very poor. A great smile changes everything. If everyone had the possibility of a great smile available, people would live longer, they would be happier, they would age slower and they would work longer. That’s the truth!

Top 10 Reasons to Smile as you Age

Top 10 Reasons to  Smile as You Age

1. Smiling Boosts  Your Immune System

Smiling helps your immune  system work well. When you smile, immune function improves because you  are more relaxed and allow your body to exist in a more positive, stress-free  environment. Prevent the flu and colds by smiling more!

2. Smiling Makes  Us Attractive– Makes Us Look Better

We are drawn to people who smile. There  is an attraction factor that happens. We want to know a smiling person  and figure out what is so good. Frowns, scowls and grimaces all push  people away — but a smile draws them. Smile at more people more often.

3. Smiling Changes  Our Mood & Attitude

Next time you are feeling  down, try putting on a smile. Try smiling more, over a period a few  minutes or few hours, there’s a good chance your mood will change for  the better. Smiling can trick the body into helping you change your  mood.

4. Smiling is Contagious

When someone is smiling,  they lighten up the room, change the moods of others, and make things  happier. A smiling person brings happiness along with them. Smile lots  and you will draw more people to you.

5. Smiling Relieves  Stress

Stress can really show  up in our faces. Smiling helps to prevent us from looking stressed,  tired, worn down, and overwhelmed. When you are stressed, take time  to put on a smile. The stress should be reduced and you’ll be better  able to take positive actions.

6. Smiling Lowers  Your Blood Pressure

When you smile, there  is a measurable reduction in your Blood Pressure. Give it a try if you  have a blood pressure monitor at home. Sit for a few minutes, take a  reading. Then smile for a minute and take another reading while still  smiling. Do you notice a difference? Smiling is good for the blood!

7. Smiling Releases  Endorphins, Natural Pain Killers and Serotonin

Studies have shown that  smiling releases endorphins, natural pain killers, and serotonin. Together  these three make us feel good. Smiling is a free, “natural drug”.

8.  Smiling Lifts the Face and Makes You Look Younger

The muscles we use to  smile lift the face, making a person appear younger. Don’t go out and  get a face lift, just try smiling your way through the day — you’ll  look younger and feel better. If  you look at people who have wrinkles or facial lines, you’ll notice  that most of the lines on their face follow their most natural facial  expressions.  If you were to choose between frown lines or smile lines  as your lines and wrinkles for the future, which would you rather?

9. Smiling Makes  You Seem Successful in Life

Smiling people appear  more confident, happier, more settled in their lives, and more likely  to be approached in social settings. Put on a smile at gatherings and  people will react to you differently.

10. Smiling Helps  You Stay Positive

Try this test: Smile.  Now try to think of something negative without losing the smile. It’s  hard. When we smile our body is sending the rest of us a message that  “Life is Good!” Stay away from depression, stress and worry  by smiling more!

The more you smile,  the more positive you feel and see things.  There was another research  study where participants were either encouraged or prevented to smile.   Those that were able to smile rated cartoons as being funnier than the  group who were prevented to smile, implying that your overall outlook  is more positive and happy.

Smile as  much as you can.  If you concentrate on smiling, you actually can  feel better.  Believe it or not, there is research behind this.  There  is a theory called ‘facial feedback’ hypothesis.  It states that  “involuntary facial movements provide sufficient peripheral information  to drive emotional experience” implying that you may actually improve  your mood (and life!) by smiling.